Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle
Vase with papillon decor by Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle

Vase with papillon decor 1910 - 1920

Johann Lötz Witwe Klostermühle

Glass
13 cm, ø 13 cm
ConditionExcellent
€ 1.000 - 2.000

Dille Art

  • About the artwork
    Beautiful vase with intense colours. The vase has a flared neck and has a papillon decor in iridescent colours, from light to deep blue, soft green-yellow and violet. The vase is in excellent condition.

    About Johann Lötz Witwe:
    Lötz/Loetz was founded by Johann Lötz in 1840 and the company was located in Bohemia, in the Czech Republic, at the time Lötz belonged to the Austrian-Hungarian Empire.
    In 1879 a grandson of Lötz, Max Ritter-Von Spaun, took over the business from his grandmother, he kept the name Joh. Lotz Witwe.
    From that moment on, Johann Lötz Witwe really started to make a name for themselves, they developed new innovative glass techniques, but their design and the bright colours were also completely innovative. They designed special shapes and vases, high end items, which they sold in luxury stores in Vienna, Berlin, Hamburg, Paris, London, Milan, Brussels and Madrid. It soon made them very well known and famous.

    It was the period when Art Nouveau or, as it was called in Germany, Jugendstil flourished. They used organic shapes, nature was their example, also for Lötz. They developed beautiful decors, resembling butterfly wings, such as the papillon decor of this vase, often the shapes were organically formed by unevenly shaping the hot glass with tongs, as also flowers are formed. But an octopus or sea shells were also used as examples for their special vases and decors.

    Lötz took part in all kinds of World Exhibitions, including the famous 1900 World Exhibition in Paris where they won the grand prize. They have been awarded numerous prizes for participation in World Exhibitions. Max Ritter von Spaun also received special awards for his contribution to the glass industry. In 1883 he was allowed to use the Imperial eagle in their shield and seal, they were also allowed to put "K.K. Private Glass Factory" in front of their name. In 1889 he also received a knighthood from Franz Josef. But other royal houses also did not go unnoticed, he received the Belgian Leopold's order, and the honourable French Legion d'Honneur.

    Their designs were loved, including in the United States. Lötz patented some of their special techniques, such as the one they used to make the Phänomen decor. They were able to make iridescent glass. In short, Lötz had become a household name. And it still is.

    Lötz also worked closely with other glass manufacturers such as J.&L. Lobmeyer and E. Bakolowits Söhne in Vienna and with Argentor. In addition, Lötz worked closely with various artists, such as Josef Hoffmann, Koloman Moser, Franz Hofstötter, Michael Powolny and other artists of the Wiener Werkstätte. Michael Powolny was responsible for the more stylized tango vases from the 1920s.

    The First World War and the end of the Austrian Empire marked a difficult period for Lötz.
    Lötz existed until 1940, after a bombing raid the factory was completely burned down. After WWII, the Czech Republic belonged to the satellite states of the Soviet Union, the factory was nationalized, until it was finally closed in 1947.

    Lötz glass is still very popular and is collected worldwide, their oeuvre can also be found in many museum collections.

    Literature:
    - Guiseppe Gappa; 'Le génie verrier de l'Europe', p. 95-107. Pierre Mardaga, Belgique, 1998, p. 95-107.
    - Victor Arwas, 'Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco', p. 202-212. Academy Editions London 1987,
    p. 202-212.
    - 'Das Böhmische Glas 1700-1950', Passauer Glasmuseum, Georg Höltl, Passau 1995.
    Band IV: Jugendstil in Böhmen, p. 16-133, afbeelding p.57, fig.IV.76.
    - Victor Arwas, 'Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco', p 202-212. Academy Editions London, 1987.
  • About the artist

    De Eerste Wereldoorlog en het einde van het Oostenrijkse Keizerrijk betekende een moeilijke periode voor Lötz.
    Lötz bestond tot 1940, na een bombardement was de fabriek volledig afgebrand. Na WOII behoorde Tsjechië tot de satellietstaten van de Sovjet-Unie, de fabriek werd genationaliseerd, totdat deze definitief gesloten werd in 1947.


    Lötz glas is nog steeds erg geliefd en wordt wereldwijd verzameld, daarnaast is hun oeuvre ook in vele musea collecties terug te vinden.


    The Loetz glassworks existed in Klostermuhle, Austria, for just over a hundred years, starting from 1840. But its heyday was during the life-time of Max Ritter Von Spaun, grandson of the original Johann Loetz who had founded the company. Von Spaun took over the company in 1879 and ran it until 1908, a year before his death. He was assisted by Eduard Prochaska, his technical specialist, and together they invented, designed and produced a whole series of wonderful new types of glass, taking out several patents and winning awards at all the major world exhibitions during the 1890's and the first years of the new century.


    The Loetz company were amongst the leaders in Art Nouveau design and expecially in irridescent art glass. "Papillon" glass, like the vase on the left, is sometimes known today as "oil spot" glass. Another favorite Loetz coloring was irridized glass with pulled trails called "Phenomenon" glass. There were irridized vases with ribbons of metallic colors winding over the surface, and many spectacular designs with applied trails of beautiful colours, or simply pulled out of the body of the glass to form handles or decoration.


    About 1900 the company started collaborating with outside designers, and some great artists designed pieces for Lotz, notably Joseph Hofmann, Koloman Moser, Maria Kirchner, and Hofstatter.


    In 1908 Loetz was taken over by Max Von Spaun's son, also called Max, and although it struggled financially (going through bankruptcy in 1911 and again in 1931) there were several great designers whose work was produced by Loetz during those years and through the art decoration period. These included Adolf Beckert and Michael Powolny.


     

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