Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist
Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist
Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist
Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist
Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist
Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist
Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist
Victorian antique silver on gold cross by Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

Victorian antique silver on gold cross 1850

GoldSilverGemstoneDiamond
€ 650

Adin Fine Antique Jewellery

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About the artwork

Antique jewelry object group: pendant

Condition: good condition
  -  (more info on our condition scale)

Country of origin:Although it does not carry any legible control marks we believe this to be of Belgian origin.

Style: Victorian - Victorian decorative arts refers to the style of decorative arts during the Victorian era. The Victorian era is known for its eclectic revival and interpretation of historic styles and the introduction of cross-cultural influences from themiddle east and Asia in furniture, fittings, and Interior decoration. Victorian design is widely viewed as having indulged in a regrettable excess of ornament. The Arts and Crafts movement, the aesthetic movement, Anglo-Japanese style, and Art Nouveaustyle have their beginnings in the late Victorian era.
  -  See also: Victorianor more info on styles

Period: ca. 1850
  -  (events and facts in 1850)

Theme: Cross - The cross is one of the most ancient human symbols, and is used by many religions, such as Christianity. It is frequently a representation of the division of the world into four elements (or cardinal points), or alternately as the union of theconcepts of divinity, the vertical line, and the world, the horizontal line. (from: Wikipedia)

Material: Silver on top and backed with 18K red gold (see explanation on silver on gold).
  -  (more info on precious metals)

Technique: The rose cuts are set on foil. This is a special technique that was used to bring the lustre of the diamonds to its best quality.

Extra information:The stones used are one of the earliest diamond imitations, named strass; A brilliant paste made out of lead glass and used to simulate various transparant gemstones. It is a borosilicate of potassium and lead, with small quantities of alumina. When uncoloured it was used to simulate diamonds, being transparent and veryrefractive, although much softer; the addition of metallic oxides and salts produces coloured strass to imitate most known gemstones. It is named after Georges-Frédéric Strass (1701-1773) who was born at Wolfsheim, near Strasbourg, where he learned to make jewelry and artificial gems; he moved to Paris in 1724, and there invented, from 1730 to 1734, new techniques for making imitation precious stones (imitation diamonds having been known in Paris in the 17th century). He ceded the making of such ware in 1752 to Georges-Michel Bapst (1718-1780), husband of his niece. Such artificial gems are now made mainly in Czechoslovakia, Austria, and France. Many writers and standard dictionaries have attributed the invention to a Joseph Stras(s)(er) of Vienna, but no record of such a person is known, and the legends about him has been discredited.

Precious stones:11 old brilliant cut strass (also called paste)
  -  (more info on precious stones)

Birthstones: Diamond is the birthstone (or month stone) for April.
  -  (more info on birthstones)

Hallmarks: Illegible remains.
  -  (more info on hallmarks)

Dimensions: 4,20 cm (1,65 inch) x 2,70 cm (1,06 inch)

Weight: 2.60 gram (1.67 dwt)

Reference Nº: 13063-0046

Copyright photography: Adin, fine antique jewelry