Art World News: November 14th

Emily Cavanagh
International Sales
14 Articles1 Curated artwork

Welcome back to another week of Art World News with Gallerease. Some enticing events rocked the art world this week including a grand theft, astonishing auction records, a Schiele teaser and much more. We hope you enjoy and stay tuned for further updates!

 

Birds eye view of the MoMA PS1. 

 

This week, two gelatin prints by the artist Alex V. Sobolewski were stolen - and returned - from the MoMA PS1 in New York. The works were part of the exhibition ‘Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting,” and equated to just over $100,000 US.

In what has proven to be a very unusual circumstance, the works were both returned to the contemporary art institution, by post, on Monday. So far, no note and no further explanation is available.

 

Lot # 1: Vincent van Gogh, 'Laboureur dans un Champ,' c. 1889. Courtesy of Christie's NY.

 

New York's big auction week is off to an electric start as Christie's Impressionist and Modern Art sale reached a total of $479.3 million US, its second highest total for the genre since 2007. To add some persepctive, that's twice the total of last years Impressionist and Modern Art sale. The top ten lots on offer had individual estimates of 10 million US or higher, emphasizing the strength of the market. 

Van Gogh's 'Laboureur dans un Champ' pictured above sold for a whopping $81.3 million US. This is just the beginning of auction week in New York so stay tuned for more updates - including the results of Leonardo da Vinci's "Salvador Mundi," a painting that has the entire art world buzzing. 

 

 

We are smack dab in the middle of Dubai Design week, which runs from November 13 - November 18. If you find yourself exploring the Middle East at this time, you won't want to miss the regions greatest design festival. Designers, artists and architects are invited to showcase their innovative collections and exceptional creativity. 

 

Egon Schiele, 'Aktselbstbildnis,' c. 1916. 

 

Now for some art world humour: 

Ads for Egon Schiele's upcoming show in Vienna had to be modified, ie. censored, for officials in both Britain and Germany decided that the contorted nudes were too promiscuous to be displayed publically, in all their glory. The modified campaign now exhibits the same artworks but with the genitals covered with a banner that reads, “SORRY, 100 years old but still too daring today.” - The New York Times

We love the cheeky wit & look forward to Viennese Modernism 2018

 

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Written by Emily Cavanagh on 14 Nov 2017, 12:30 Category Art World News