Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter
Vide poche 'Capricorne' by Amalric Walter

Vide poche 'Capricorne' 1920 - 1925

Amalric Walter

Pâte de VerreGlass
2 ⨯ 9 ⨯ 10 cm
ConditionExcellent
Price on request

Dille Art

  • About the artwork

    An amber colored vide poche from pâte de noche with a beetle, an ibex beetle. In French, that beetle is called a 'capricorne'. Henri Bergé designed this vide poche between 1906-1913, Amalric Walter only executed it between 1920-1925. These vide poches are known in several color combinations. This vide poche is also depicted in the book about Amalric Walter, in exactly the same color scheme. The vide poche is in good condition and is signed with 'H. Berge SC.' and "A. Walter, Nancy." Henri Bergé and Amalric Walter have worked together a lot in their careers, Bergé designed several designs for Daum which were manufactured by Walter in pâte de noche. After Walter also started his own studio in 1919, both continued to work together regularly. For those wondering what is meant by a 'vide poche', here is a brief explanation. The literal meaning is 'empty pocket', a vide poche was intended to place the contents of your pocket when undressing, for example change, but also earrings or your ring. Sometimes you can still see them in smaller shops in France, meant for change. It was even very fashionable at the time, often given out by manufacturers who could advertise in that way. This 'vide poche' was already very chic at the time and only affordable for the more affluent. Dimensions: Length: 10.3cm (4.06") Width: 9.2cm (3.62") Height: 2cm (79")

  • About the artist

    Amalric Walter (France, 1870-1959) was a very good glassmaker who was originally trained as a ceramist in Sèvre, Daum persuaded him to come and work with them and develop the making of vases and figures in the difficult, newly rediscovered pâte de noche , which he has done with great success and especially in collaboration with Henri Bergé.

    From 1919 to 1935 Walter worked as a self-employed person and started his own studio. He also still worked a lot with Henri Bergé, but he also collaborated with several other artists.

    Walter is best known for his animal figures made of glass paste, but also for smaller utensils such as this vide poche, he has also made various pendants that were often worn with a silk cord by the most modern ladies from the better circles, 1920s.

    Amalric Walter did not have a high production, each design was made in small editions, partly because of this his work is sought after and can be found in various private and museum collections.

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